Hungarian Review Publishes Sixth 2012 Issue

Washington, DC – The “Hungarian Review”, the English-language affiliate of the bi-monthly journal Magyar Szemle, edited by Gyula Kodolányi, has published its sixth 2012 issue.  This important edition gives comprehensive overview of the current political situation in Hungary in English language.  As the editors of the periodical write in the introductory article:

“(…)The old glory of late 19th century Budapest is shining through again in the many restored sumptuous house fronts, restaurants, and museums, while the city infrastructure has made some progress during those 20 years despite everythingBod,a former Governor of the National Bank,contend sthat the potential of the metropolis remains high, and points to the masses of new jobs for qualified Hungarians in the financial services sector as a hopeful sign. Bod speculates that the southern expansion of the EU into Croatia next year, and even the crisis in the more established South, in Greece, Spain, and Portugal may cause a shift of prominence back to Central Europe, with Budapest reaping the rewards. But all this will need skilful handling by the current Mayor, István Tarlós, and by the central government.”

“Also in this edition we have the thoughts of two highly respected journalists and commentators. John O’Sullivan, former executive editor of Radio Free Europe, writes on the drama of Cardinal Mindszenty’s life, from opponent of Nazism to prisoner of Stalinism to “victim of history”. Mindszenty shared, O’Sullivan suggests, Pope John Paul II’s conviction that communism’s roots in the population were much shallower than generally thought, and that its end was nigh – even when such ideas were treated as anathema in the age of Détente.”

“Nick Thorpe studies two resourceful examples of recycling in Hungary and wonders whether the country might be on the brink of a golden age of responsible re-use of waste, after squandering its initial, Communist era advantage.”

“As in our November issue last year, we devote a cluster of essays and memoirs to the events of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and its aftermath. György Gömöri and Mátyás Sárközi remember how they as young refugee students were received by the hospitable British – and how their first steps in that country were guided by marvellous people like Zoltán Szabó, the senior Hungarian writer in exile, whoseNotes on Orwelladd that extra dimension to the appreciation of that British genius, which only survivors of Communism could have earned, the hard way. ”

The Hungarian Review has been published since 1991 by the BL Nonprofit Kft in Budapest, Hungary.  Currently, eleven issues of the Hungarian Review (from 2010, 2011 and 2012) can be ordered from Amazon.com; or directly from the publisher; or by calling the Coalition office in Washington.

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