Hungarian American Coalition Announces Winners of Dr. Elemér and Éva Kiss Scholarship for 2012-2013 Academic Year

Six students were awarded the Dr. Elemér and Éva Kiss Scholarship Awards for the 2012-2013 academic year. The winners are: 

Tünde Cserpes, who is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Illinois in Chicago; Edit Frenyó, a candidate for an SJD at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC.;  Dorottya Irén Győri, a former scholarship winner in 2010 and 2011, who is a rising senior business major at Messiah College in Grantham, PA; Petra Kövér, who is enrolled in the Business Administration program with a major in Hospitality and Tourism Management at Webber International University in Babson Park, FL; Tamás Kubik, scholarship winner in 2009, pursuing a BA degree, majoring in English at Sewanee – The University of the South; Bettina Varga, admitted to the Hult Master of International Marketing program at Hult International Business School in San Francisco, CA.
 
The Dr. Elemér and Éva Kiss Scholarship Program was established as a special memorial scholarship by the family and friends of Dr. Elemér and Éva Kiss, of Chevy Chase, Maryland.  Dr. and Mrs. Kiss, members of the Coalition since its founding in 1991, left Hungary after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, and settled with their family in Maryland.  They demonstrated a life-long commitment to education both in Hungary and in the United States. 
 
The Hungarian American Coalition first established the Scholarship Fund in 1997, in response to requests from a large number of Hungarian students, who gained acceptance to American colleges and universities, but needed additional financial assistance to complete their studies.  Since then each year the Coalition has provided partial scholarships to outstanding Hungarian students who pursue full-time studies in the United States. The scholarship is given to those who have already won admission to a U.S. university.  For more information visit our website at www.hacusa.org.
 
 
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